How To Smoke Tube Breakfast Sausage.

Video with Chris Marks of Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces showing how to prepare (Jimmy Dean) tube breakfast sausage fo a BBQ smoker.

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Carolina Style Pulled Turkey

Ingredients

1- 3-4# Turkey Breast

Three Little Pig’s Carolina BBQ Sauce

Three Little Pig’s Memphis BBQ Rub

Yellow Mustard

Directions

  1. Use yellow mustard to coat both sides of the Turkey Breast, liberally coat both sides of the Turkey Breast with Three Little Pig’s Memphis BBQ rub.
  2. Heat the Smoker or Grill to 300 degrees, add favorite flavor wood, I prefer cherry or pecan.
  3. Smoke or Grill Turkey Breast to 165 degrees, measure with a thermometer to verify correct temperature. I prefer the Thermapen quick read.
  4. Remove the turkey breast from the smoker or grill coarsely shred with two forks.
  5. Mix Three Little Pig’s Carolina BBQ sauce with the pulled pork, add more sauce for more intense flavor.
  6. Serve the turkey on buns with slaw.

Chris Marks CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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Pig Candy Bacon Recipe


Ingredients:
• 1-Bottle of Three Little Pigs Touch of Cherry Rub
• 10-12 slices of bacon (about 1 1/4 pound of thick-cut bacon)
• 1/4 cup pure Grade A maple syrup

Directions (Oven)

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2.  Line a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment. Place a baking or cooling rack atop the lined baking sheet and lay the bacon side-by-side.
  3.  Sprinkle Touch of Cherry BBQ Rub onto the bacon, pressing it into the bacon to be sure it adheres.
  4.  Bake for 8 minutes, or until very lightly brown. Take the bacon out of the oven and brush the top side of the bacon with maple syrup. Return to the oven to bake for an additional 2-3 minutes. After the 3-minute mark, flip the bacon over, and sprinkle the bacon with the Touch of Cherry BBQ Rub.
  5.  Return to the oven and bake for an additional 10 minutes. Brush the top side with maple syrup and bake for an additional 2-3 minutes.
  6.  Allow the bacon to reach room temperature, until it’s cool enough to handle and then transfer the bacon to a sheet of parchment or a plate. Place the bacon in the fridge until you’re ready to serve.

Directions (Smoker) 

  1. Preheat the smoker to 300 degrees F. Add smoking wood of Choice- I prefer wild cherry.
  2. Line a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment. Place a baking or cooling rack atop the lined baking sheet and lay the bacon side-by-side.
  3.  Sprinkle Touch of Cherry BBQ Rub onto the bacon, pressing it into the bacon to be sure it adheres.
  4.  Smoke for 20 minutes, or until very lightly brown. Take the bacon out of the smoker, brush the top side of the bacon with maple syrup. Return to the smoker for an additional 10 minutes. After the 10 minute mark, flip the bacon over, and sprinkle the bacon with the Touch of Cherry  BBQ Rub.

Chris Marks CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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The Science of Cooking a Turkey

 

Have you ever cooked a perfect turkey? Were the breasts moist and tender and the leg completely cooked? Chances are, not always. Why is it so hard to get the dark meat cooked perfectly without over cooking the white meat? The reason is that a turkey is actually two distinctly different kinds of meat. The breast meat is very different from the leg, thigh and wing meat. This can create a real challenge when it comes to cooking the perfect bird.

The make-up of a turkey:

At the biochemical level a turkey is a combination of approximately 3 parts water to one-part fat and one-part protein. Most of the meat comes from muscle fibers in the turkey, which are mostly proteins – notably myosin and actin. Because turkeys rarely fly but rather walk, they contain far more fat in their legs than in their breast, which results in the strong differences in texture between these sections of the bird – and the difficulty in making sure that all portions of the bird are properly heated.

The science of cooking a turkey:

As you cook the turkey, muscle fibers contract until they begin to break up at around 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Bonds within the molecules begin to break down, causing proteins to unravel, and the dense muscle meat to become tenderer. Collagen in the bird (one of three protein fibers that attach muscles to the bone) breaks down into softer gelatin molecules as it unwinds.

The dryness of a turkey is a result of muscle proteins coagulating within the meat, which can result if it is cooked too long.

Temperature differentials in cooking a turkey:

Part of the problem, as described above, is that the different nature of the light and dark meat in a turkey results in different rates to reach the coagulation of the muscle proteins. If you cook it too long, the breast meat has coagulated; if you don’t cook the bird long enough, the dark meat is still tough and chewy. Harold McGee, a food science writer, indicates aiming for 155 – 160 degrees Fahrenheit in the breast), but you want 180 degrees or above in the leg.

White Turkey Meat

  • White meat is found in the breast and wing muscles of a turkey.
  • Turkey can fly, but it is not their main mode of locomotion. Turkeys use their wing muscles when they need a burst of speed to escape predators. These muscles produce a lot of power, but they fatigue quickly.
  • Turkey breast and wing muscles consist mainly of white muscle fibers. These fibers contract quickly and split ATP at a fast pace, though they become exhausted quickly, too.
  • White fibers are powered by anaerobic respiration, so a turkey can move quickly even though its muscles may have exhausted the available oxygen. The tissue contains a large amount of glycogen, which can be used as fast energy source.

Dark Turkey Meat

  • Turkey legs and thighs are dark meat.
  • Turkey spends a lot of time walking on the ground. Their leg muscles are adapted for regular, continuous use.
  • Leg and thigh muscles consist primarily of red muscle fibers. These fibers contract slowly and split ATP for energy at a relatively low rate.
  • Red muscle fibers rely on aerobic respiration. The protein uses oxygen to relax/contract, so this tissue is rich in capillaries, which give it a deep color and rich flavor. Dark meat contains a lot of myoglobin and is rich in mitochondria, which produce energy for the muscle tissue.

Smoked Turkey

Smoked turkey has a different color and texture than oven roasted turkey. The meat may appear pink and have a smoother texture. This is normal. The smoking process causes a chemical change in turkey that changes the color of the flesh. If the turkey registers a temperature of 165 degrees F. it is safe to eat no matter the color.

This requires a cooking time:

  • At 235 degrees F your turkey will take 30 to 35 minutes per pound. At 250 degrees F your turkey will take 25 to 30 minutes per pound. At 275 degrees F your turkey will take 20 to 25 minutes per pound.
  • I really do not recommend stuffing your turkey for smoking. This increases the cooking time (about 5 minutes a pound) and puts a lot of food in contact with potential bacteria. For smoking, it is best that your turkey can cook from the inside as well as the out.
  • Before the turkey goes in the smoker you will want to add some flavor to the bird. This is best done with a spice rub. I use Three Little Pig’s Touch of Cherry Rub on the Turkey after I rub it down with Olive Oil first.
  • With the smoker hot and the bird on the cooking grate, it is time to build up a good dose of smoke. Meat absorbs more smoke early on during the cooking process than it does later, so now is the time to get the smoke going.
  • Any wood (except maybe mesquite) is a good choice for your smoke. I like a mixture of hickory and cherry. This gives a strong smoke flavor from the hickory and a sweet flavor from the cherry wood. Of course, whatever you like is the way to go.
  • Look for the center of the breast and push the meat thermometer into it but avoid getting it on the bone. Bone heats faster than meat and will give you a false reading. Next, check the thigh between the leg and the body. Now do the same thing on the other side. The lowest reading is the one you use. You are looking for a temperature between 165 (Breast) and 175 degrees F (Thighs).

Link to Advanced Turkey Cooking methods, Spatchcocking,Injections and brines.

Chris Marks CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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Guide to Grilling the Perfect Asparagus or Green Beans

Cleaning

Select fresh green beans and/or asparagus and wash in cold water. For asparagus, snap off the bottom end of each spear. The natural breaking point varies slightly from spear to spear. Discard the bottom ends. For green beans, cut off and discard the stem ends.

 Marinating

Place the vegetables in a plastic zip-loc freezer bag and add fresh lemon juice, extra virgin olive oil, Three Little Pig’s All Purpose Rub. For one bundle of asparagus, or enough green beans to serve two, use the juice (and pulp) from ½ of a large lemon, ¼ cup olive oil, about 1 tablespoon of garlic flakes, and a light sprinkling of salt. Seal the bag, squeezing out as much air as possible, and let marinate for at least 15 minutes.

 Grilling

Place the vegetables over direct heat on the grill surface in a loose pile, being cautious of flare-ups from the olive oil. If you take a little care to drop the vegetables on the grill one piece at a time, you shouldn’t be bringing too much oil along with them. Discard the liquid. I like using Grill Grates they are perfect for these veggies, but if the spacing on your grill surface is wider than the beans or the asparagus, take care to place them across the grates. Place the veggies in a loose pile. At 500 to 600 degrees the veggies should grill for a total of about 6 minutes with the hood closed. Halfway through, turn the veggies over. It is not important to turn each bean or asparagus spear over, just loosely turn most of the pile over using tongs and slightly redistribute on the grill surface.

When done, the vegetables should still be crisp and green, with blackened spots over less then 25% of the surface. Remove from the grill and serve. Add a little salt if necessary, but the veggies should still be glistening and moist, needing no butter or additional oil.

Serve grilled beans or asparagus alongside fish, steaks or chops, simply prepping them as the grill preheats and then adding them to the fire six minutes before the main dish is done. This method also works well for ¼” thick slices of zucchini, but you need to use only about a tablespoon of lemon juice. The sliced zucchini really absorbs the lemon flavor.

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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Plank Grilling

So What Is Planking?

Put simply, planking is cooking food directly on a piece of hardwood. When cooking this way, the surface of the food touching the wood picks up some of the plank’s natural flavors. Although there’s some debate on the origins of planking, it’s been documented that Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest pinned their salmon to large wood boards, then slow cooked them—planking.

Since then, the method has been carried down and modified for the home cook, with the grill being primary means of planking, but also adapted for use in the oven as well. (Planks for the oven are usually thicker, larger, and more expensive then those made for the grill.)

Plank Types & Sizes

Cedar lends sweet, spicy and smoky flavors, while maple and cherry woods provide the highest degree of sweetness. As one would expect, plank grilling with cherry wood also adds identifiable fruit accents to food. In this way, the type of plank you choose really can be as important as the ingredients you use in a marinade or rub to flavor your meat or vegetables.

Grillers who want to cook a larger meal all at once would select a larger plank. Those who prefer to create single servings will usually use a smaller plank — one that can be easily transferred to add drama and panache to a guest’s place setting.

Plank thickness is another variable to consider. Most grillers say that the ideal plank thickness is around 3/8 to 5/8 of an inch. Planks that are thicker can restrict the transfer of heat and don’t work as well. Conversely, planks that are only 1/4 of an inch thick are considered more disposable and can usually be used only once.

Plank Arrangement

Once the plank is soaked, place it on the grill—cooking side down—at medium heat for 3-5 minutes and allow it to dry out slightly. Why soak a plank and then heat it immediately? This process will eliminate any bacteria from the plank and allow for safe cooking as you place your food directly on the plank.

Brush a light coating of olive oil onto the cooking side of the board. To enhance a meal’s flavor rub a clove of garlic on the plank, or lay a bed of fresh herbs on the cooking side of the plank before placing your main course on top of it.

Feeling even more adventurous? Drill some holes into your plank, and stuff garlic, basil, thyme or other seasonings into each hole.

Direct Heat  (Grilling)
This method promotes a heavy smoke flavor. Use the lowest setting on your gas grill or low heat on the charcoal grill. Place the plank with food directly over the heat source. Cook with the lid closed, so that smoke surrounds the food and infuses it with flavor. The plank should reach heavy smoke within 20 minutes. When the plank begins to smoke, it’s important that you check it often (and use that water spray bottle to extinguish any flame on the plank).

Indirect Heat (Smoking)
While the cooking time increases due to the lower temperature, this method promotes a light smoke flavor. Using a medium setting on your grill, place the plank opposite the heat source. Cook with the lid closed so smoke surrounds your food. The plank should begin to smoke after 15-20 minutes. The plank should not catch fire using this method.

When done cooking on the plank, immediately douse the plank with water. This can extend the plank’s life, and prevents the possibility of fire dangers should the plank be haphazardly set aside.

Simple Plank Salmon Recipe

INGREDIENTS:

· 1 cup (packed) brown sugar

· 1-quart water

· 1 cup sugar

· 1/4 cup salt

· 6 5- to 6-ounce salmon fillets with skin

. Wood Grilling Planks

· Three Little Pig’s Championship BBQ Rub

· Three Little Pig’s Competition BBQ Sauce

Instructions:

· Stir first 4 ingredients in large bowl until both sugars dissolve. Add salmon, skin side up, to brine, pressing to submerge. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Remove salmon from brine; discard brine. Rinse salmon under cold water. Place salmon, skin side down, on plank. Let stand until top is dry to touch (do not pat dry), about 1 hour.

· Lightly apply Extra Virgin Olive Oil to non-skin side of salmon.

· Apply Three Little Pig’s Kansas City Championship Rub on non-skin side of salmon.

· Prepare  Grill or Smoker with All-Natural Lump Charcoal and set smoking temp to 250 degrees for the Salmon.

· Arrange salmon, skin side down, on rectangle. Place salmon on plank on smoker or grill. Cook until salmon is firm to touch and glaze forms over salmon, usually 45 minutes to 1 hour.

· Remove salmon from plank, leaving skin on plank . Lightly glaze with Three Little Pig’s Competition BBQ Sauce, transfer salmon to platter; serve warm or at room temperature. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill. Bring to room temperature before serving.)


Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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Grilling Spatchcock Chicken on a PK360 Grill

Working on new recipes for BBQ Spatchcock Chicken on the PK360 BBQ Grill. I used a different type mustard  bbq sauce pre-cook to help flavor the skin and also hold the bbq rub to form better for a crispier and a more of BBQ flavor than smoke flavor during the grilling process.

On the Preparation process the chicken was spatchcocked (Backbone removed), Rub Some Butt Carolina  Mustard BBQ sauce was applied to front and back of the Spatchcocked chicken and Three Little Pig’s Memphis  BBQ rub was applied to both sides. Then I used a Jaccard tenderizer to puncture the skin on the breast side to help render the fat to force flavor deeper in the chicken.

Tools Used: 

  1. Three Little Pig’s Memphis BBQ Rub
  2. Rub Some-Butt Carolina Mustard BBQ Sauce
  3. Jaccard Tenderizer
  4. PK360 Grill
  5. Grill Grates
  6. Lump Charcoal

YouTube Video 1 the Start 

 

YouTube Video 2 the Finish: 

I added the Chicken on the PK360 Grill, once the temperature reached 350 degrees and maintained that temperature the entire cook. I grilled the breast meat to 165 degrees and the thighs and drums to 175 degrees. The dark meat will cook quicker due to higher fat content and not as dense as the breast meat. The Grill time was 1:20 minutes to hit temperatures running at 350 degrees.

I used a wide spatula to flip the chicken (2) times during the grilling process, this proved to be a little difficult due to space issues but as the chicken tightened up it became easier to flip.

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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Three Little Pig’s Smoked BBQ Meat Loaf

Smoked BBQ Meatloaf Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 lbs. ground hamburger
  • 2 Cups of Three Little Pig’s Competition BBQ Sauce
  • 1 cup panko bread crumbs
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup onion minced
  • 1/2 cup parmesan grated
  • 1/2 cup (3.5 oz) fresh mozzarella, diced
  • Three Little Pig’s All-Purpose BBQ Rub

Instructions

  1. Preheat your Smoker to 250ºF, set up for  BBQ smoking, I use Cherry for my smoking wood.
  2. Combine the ground hamburger, 1 cup of Three Little Pig’s Competition BBQ Sauce, panko, egg, onion and cheeses in a bowl and mix well by hand.
  3. Place the mixture on a work surface and form the meat into a loaf shape. Season well with Three Little Pig’s All-Purpose  BBQ Rub.
  4. Smoke the meatloaf at 250 degrees until internal temperatures reaches 160 degrees, use the remaining Competition BBQ Sauce to glaze the meatloaf for the last 10 minutes before serving hot off the grill.

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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2nd Video on How To Prepare Kansas City Style Beef Burn’t Ends

Second Video on How to Prepare Kansas City Style BBQ Beef Burnt Ends  with Chris Marks of Three Little Pig’s Sauces & Rubs. I will show how to take the burnt ends back to the smoker after cubed to make a double burnt end for a more enchanced smoky richness.

Products Used in Video:

  1.  Three Little Pigs Competition BBQ Sauce
  2.  Three Little Pig’s Spicy Chipotle BBQ Sauce
  3.  Beef Broth
  4. Victorinox 12” Granton-Edge Slicer

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

 

 

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How To prepare Kansas City style Beef Burn’t Ends

Kansas City Style BBQ Beef Burn’t Ends

First Video on How to Prepare Kansas City Style Burn’t Ends  with Chris Marks of Three Little Pig’s Sauces & Rubs.

Products Used in Video:

  1.  Three Little Pigs Texas Beef Rub
  2.  Three Little Pig’s Memphis Rub
  3.  Yellow Mustard
  4.  Jaccard Tenderizer .

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

 

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