Questions and Answers on Smoking Pork Loin

 

How do you smoke a pork loin?

Set the temperature to 250F on the smoker. Arrange the Pork loins on the grill grate and smoke until the internal temperature of the pork is at least 145F (medium-rare), 2-1/2 to 3 hours.

How long do you smoke a pork loin per pound?

Smoked 3-4-pound pork loins to meat temperature 145 took about 2 hours to reach 145 smoking at 250 degrees. Added a light wood like Cherry, Apple or Peach as soon as you put the pork loin on the smoker, no need to add any more wood after that.  Nice smoked favor, moist and tender Resulted in medium cook.

How long do you brine pork loin?

Immerse pork loin in the cooled brine mixture, and refrigerate for 12 hours or overnight (up to 24 hours) turning occasionally if necessary for even brining.

Can pork loin be over brined?

While under-brining won’t have a negative effect of foods, over-brining can be disastrous. Either using too much salt or brining for too long will leave you with a cut of meat that is too salty to eat. … While some cuts of pork can use days in a brine, even a relatively small amount of time can be helpful.

How do you make a brine solution?

Basic brine ratio: The basic ratio of salt to water for a brine is 4 tablespoons of salt per 1 quart (4 cups) of water. In a container large enough to hold your meat (and preferably with a lid to avoid sloshing), dissolve the salt in the water. Add your pork loin

Click here for more information on brining.

 

Three Little Pig’s Smoked Pork Loin

Slow Smoked Pork Loin Recipe

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  • Trim fat down and clear any heavy silver skin , cut the large pork loin into a manageable size, best is around 3lbs.
  • Coat the loins in olive oil than liberal coat of Three Little Pig’s Touch of Cherry Rub.
  • Set the temperature to 250F on the smoker. Add choice of flavor wood. Arrange the Pork loins on the grill grate and smoke until the internal temperature of the pork is at least 145F (medium-rare), 2-1/2 to 3 hours.
  • Glaze the finished Pork Loin with Three Little Pig’s Competition BBQ sauce for the last 5 minutes.

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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What is the Stall on Pork Butts & Briskets ?

The stall, Plateau, graphed on a 9lb Pork Butt smoking at 250 degrees .

The meat is sweating, and the moisture evaporates and cools the meat just like sweat cools you after cutting the lawn. Here’s how he proved it.

The barbecue stall is a simple consequence of evaporative cooling by the meat’s own moisture slowly released over hours from within it’s pores and cells. As the temperature of cold meat rises, the evaporation rate increases until the cooling effect balances the heat input. Then it stalls, until the last drop of available moisture is gone.”

The process seems to take all the moisture out from the surface and just below it, and this is clearly part of the formation of the crusty, jerky like, spice laden “bark” on the surface that contributes to the textural and flavor profile.

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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How to Plan Carry Over Cooking on Beef

                               Carry Over Cooking on Dense Meats 

Have you ever noticed that the internal temperature of meat continues to rise after removing it from the smoker, grill or oven? This is called carry-over cooking and is caused by residual heat transferring from the hotter exterior of the meat to the cooler center.

As a rule, the larger and thicker the cut of meats, brisket, pork butts, beef shoulder clods and the higher the cooking temperature, the more residual heat will be in the meat, and the more the internal temperature will rise during resting due to carry-over cooking. This means the meat must be removed from the heat at an internal temperature lower than your desired final internal temperature, allowing the residual heat to finish the cooking.

Carry Over Temperature Chart for Beef Tenderloins,Prime Rib and Steaks. 

 

 

 

 

It is the reason why many recipes call for standing time. The carryover cooking that occurs during standing time causes the internal temperature of the food to rise several degrees and allows for the temperature to become more equalized throughout the food. How much carryover cooking is possible depends upon the size of the food, its density, its heat capacity (ability to retain heat), and how hot its internal temperature is when you remove it from the smoker,grill or oven . Foods that are high in water have a high heat capacity, and therefore, are excellent at carryover cooking. Thus, failure to allow for standing time results in food that is overdone

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

 

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To Wash or Not Wash Raw Meat & Poultry

Food Safety experts (including us at USDA) do not recommend washing raw meat and poultry before cooking. Many bacteria are quite loosely attached and when you rinse these foods the bacteria will be spread around your kitchen.

 

 

In fact, research  shows that washing meat or poultry in water spreads bacteria throughout the kitchen—onto countertops, other food, towels and you. Water can splash bacteria up to 3 feet surrounding your sink, which can lead to illnesses. We call this cross contamination. Researchers at Drexel University have shown that it is best to move meat and poultry straight from package to pan, since the heat required for cooking will kill any bacteria that may be present.

But what about a whole turkey? USDA does not recommend washing a whole turkey before you cook your Thanksgiving meal. You are likely to spread germs around your kitchen if you do so. The only reason a whole turkey (or any meat or poultry for that matter) should be washed is if it was brined. Thanksgiving cooks who are purchasing a brined turkey, or brining their turkeys at home, must rinse the brine off before the turkey goes into the oven. If you plan on serving a brined turkey this year, here is how to minimize the risk of cross contamination.

Brined Turkey

If you must rinse the turkey and clean out the cavity, first take the time to remove dishes, dish drainers, dish towels, sponges and other objects from around the sink area. Then cover the area around your sink with paper towels. Place the roasting pan next to the sink, ready to receive the turkey.

Clean the sink with hot soapy water, rinse well, and fill it with a few inches of cold water. Even if the cavity is partially frozen, use cold water to rinse the cavity. Cold water is still warmer than the frozen cavity. Run the water gently to prevent splashing. Make sure the water is coming out the other end of the cavity. If it isn’t, the neck or giblets may still be in there.

And that’s it! No need to scrub or rinse the rest of the turkey. Hold the turkey up to let it drain into the sink and gently place the turkey in the roasting pan. Remove the paper towels, clean the sink and the area around the sink with hot soapy water, and proceed with your preparations.

Marianne Gravely, Food Safety Education Staff, Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA

Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces Simple Brine: 

Ingredients: 

  • 1/2 cup kosher salt
  • 1 Cup of Three Little Pig’s Championship Rub
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar or brown sugar
  • Small handful of aromatics (garlic cloves, thyme sprigs, whole peppercorns, bay leaves, lemon or orange zest removed in strips)

Method: 

Combine salt, sugar, aromatics and 1/2 gallon (8 cups) of water in a large pot and place over medium-high heat. Stir until sugar, salt and rub are dissolved. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Stir in remaining 1/2 gallon water (or water and ice) and cool completely.

Pour brine into a container just large enough to hold turkey comfortably. (A 4- or 5-gallon vessel should be good for a 10- to 12-pound turkey.) Add turkey; add a little more water or ice to submerge it if necessary. Turn bird a few times and then leave breast-side down in the water; place a heavy plate over the poultry if it floats. Chill 10 to 12 hours. Remove bird from brine, discard brine and roast as directed.

More Info on Turkey Prep Information: Preparing a Thanksgiving Turkey 

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

 

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Simple , Brining, Injection,Spatchcocking Methods for Turkeys

There are many ways to prepare great tasting turkey, we will only be showing you the couple simple ways that we like to cook it – Brining, Injection,Spatchcocking

Brining a whole turkey is a process in which the turkey is soaked in a salt and water solution, resulting in juicy, flavorful meat. Sugar and other rubs are sometimes use to further enhance the flavor. Brining increases the moisture content, ensuring that the turkey will stay moist, even though the long smoking period. The brining process breaks down and extracts some of the proteins from the meat, allowing liquid to be absorbed into the turkey. When the turkey is cooked, the proteins coagulate, preventing the liquid from escaping. When selecting a turkey that is going to be brined, be sure it is not pre-basted or that it is not a kosher turkey. Brining turkey that has been pre-basted is not recommended. Pre-basted and kosher turkeys have been processed with a salt solution to maintain juiciness and if brined, they may end up being too salty. Also, if the turkey is over-brined the result will be meat that is very soggy.

Brining a whole turkey is a simple process that results in moist and flavorful meat, which is generally slightly saltier than turkey prepared using other methods. When brining a turkey, you will need at least 10 to 12 hours of soaking time so preparation must begin 1 to 2 days before cooking. If you selected a frozen turkey, be sure the turkey is completely thawed before beginning the brining process.

A large container is required to accommodate the turkey and the brining solution. A 12 to 16-pound turkey will generally fit in a 20 quart stock pot. A stock pot is not necessary but it is important that the container or pot be made of stainless steel, glass, enamel or other non-corrosive material, otherwise the salt that is used may cause a chemical reaction with the container.

I use the Briner Bucket by LEM  brine with it allows plenty of room for large Turkeys and a unique locking plate insert keeps food submerged for a more effective brining process. Available in 22 quart or 8 quart. Includes pressing plate and lid in each bucket. Made in USA.

Simple Three Little Pig’s Brine

Ingredients: 

1/2 cup kosher salt

1 Cup of Three Little Pig’s Championship Rub

1/2 cup granulated sugar or brown sugar

Small handful of aromatics (garlic cloves, thyme sprigs, whole peppercorns, bay leaves, lemon or orange zest removed in strips)

Method: 

Combine salt, sugar, aromatics and 1/2 gallon (8 cups) of water in a large pot and place over medium-high heat. Stir until sugar, salt and Championship rub are dissolved. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Stir in remaining 1/2 gallon water (or water and ice) and cool completely.

Pour brine into a container just large enough to hold turkey comfortably. (A 4- or 5-gallon vessel should be good for a 10- to 12-pound turkey.) Add turkey; add a little more water or ice to submerge it if necessary. Turn bird a few times and then leave breast-side down in the water; place a heavy plate over the poultry if it floats. Chill 10 to 12 hours. Remove bird from brine, discard brine and roast as directed.

Injection, we all know that turkey tends to be a dry meat especially in the best area. This is a way to push moisture into your turkey while infusing it with great flavors at the same time. Just remember that this is a marinade so it will need some time in the meat to get the flavors.

5- Points of Injections for Turkey or Chicken. 

                       

 Simple Cajun Beer & Butter Injection

 Ingredients:

1/2-pound butter

1/2 can beer

2 tablespoons salt

2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

2 tablespoons of Three Little Pigs Memphis Rub

2 tablespoons Tabasco

1 tablespoon soy sauce

2 teaspoons garlic powder

2 teaspoons onion powder

Method:

Combine all ingredients in a sauce pan over a low heat. Stir and heat until salt is dissolved and the sauce is even and runny. Keep warm (but not hot) to inject.  Inject under the keel bone for even distribution and down legs to maximize flavor

 

Spatchcocking, A spatchcock turkey (also called “butterflied turkey”) is a whole turkey with its backbone removed. The turkey is then opened like a book and laid flat before smoking. (And it’s a whole lot easier than it might sound.)

 

   Benefits of Spatchcocking:

Cooks Faster: Flattening the turkey exposes more surface area to heat, so overall cooking time is reduced. A 10-pound spatchcock turkey was done in only 2 hour 45 minutes at 250º F. Compare that with the 4 to 4½ hours it takes to cook an unstuffed 10-pound turkey at the same 250º F.

Crisper Skin:  All the skin is exposed evenly to the heat, with none of it hiding on   the underside. That means it all crisps up evenly. And who doesn’t love crispy skin?

Juicier Turkey: Turkey has two different kinds of meat that are cooked through at two different temperatures. And there’s the problem. Breast meat starts drying out after it reaches 150° F, but dark leg meat isn’t thoroughly cooked until 165° to 170° F. People try all kinds of tricks to keep the breast from drying out while the legs are still cooking, but simply opening up the turkey and cooking it flat brings both kinds of meat to doneness at the same time. Problem solved.

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

 

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Simple Reverse Seared Rack of Lamb

Simple Reverse Seared Rack of Lamb

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

Directions:

  • Coat both side of the rack of Lamb with Extra Virgin Olive Oil.
  • Coat Rack of Lamb  with Three Little Pigs Memphis Rub. Refrigerate for at least one hour.
  • Add Rack of Lamb to your smoker and cook for about 2 hours or until medium to medium rare.

” I prefer a light smoke so I use either Cherry or Apple wood to flavor the lamb”.

  • Heat grill to medium-high heat and grill for 5 minutes a side, until the internal temperature reaches 140 degrees F.

Cut and Serve

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

 

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Smoked Pigs on the Beach

       Smoked Pigs on the Beach

Three Little Pigs BBQ Sauce & Rubs 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. If the shrimp are frozen, place them in a colander and run cold water to thaw.
  2. Remove shells & tails.
  3. Place shrimp in a bowl with some olive oil & Championship rub , set aside.
  4. Cut the smoked sausage into ½” circles. Add seasoning and set aside.
  5. Take a shrimp and place down flat, then lay a sausage round right in the center of the shrimp where it curves into a “C” shape.
  6. Push a toothpick or skewer through the sausage & shrimp to hold them together. Repeat process on the remaining shrimp & sausage.
  7. Smoke at 250 degrees 30-45 minutes until warmed all the way thru
  8. Glaze with Three Little Pig’s Spicy Chipolte BBQ Sauce.

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

 

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Smoked Chex Party Mix

               Smoked Chex Party Mix
                (Three Little Pigs Style)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients: 

  • 3 cups corn chex cereal
  • 3 cups rice chex cereal
  • 3 cups wheat chex cereal
  • 1 cup mixed nuts
  • 1 cup bite size pretzels
  • 1 cup garlic flavor bite size bagel chips or fritos
  • 6 tablespoons butter (melted)
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 ½ teaspoons Three Little Pigs KC Sweet seasoning
  • ¾ tsp garlic powder
  • ½ tsp onion powder

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, mix cereals, nuts, pretzels and bagel chips.
  2. Add melted butter and seasonings to cereal mixture and stir until evenly coated.
  3. Spread out on cookie sheet and smoke at 250 degrees for 45-60 minutes.
  4. Turn every 15 minutes.
  5. Best to store in an air tight container

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

 

 

 

 

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Smoked Sausage Scotch Eggs

Smoked Scotch Eggs

 

 

Ingredients:

Directions: 

  1. Boil & peel eggs then set aside.
  2. Mix  Three Little Pig’s All Purpose Rub  into sausage and mix well.
  3. (Keep a bowl of water to moisten hands with so sausage won’t stick to hands when forming balls)
  4. Divide sausage into ¼ lb balls and flatten out like a patty.
  5. Wrap patty around an egg.
  6.  Wrap piece of bacon around egg
  7. Smoke at 250 degrees or until the internal sausage temp is 160 degrees
  8. Dip Each Egg into Three Little Pig’s Competition BBQ Sauce

 

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

 

 

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Smoked Potato Salad

Smoked Potato Salad

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs boiling potatoes
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Coarse sea salt and ground black pepper
  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar or more to taste
  • 2 hard cooked eggs, peeled (we placed in smoker to get smoke flavor on eggs)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
  • 2 scallions, minced
  • 1 dill pickle coarsely chopped
  • Three Little Pigs Championship seasoning (2 tsp)

Directions: 

  1. Cut any larger potatoes in half or quarters.
  2. Place all potatoes in a single layer in an aluminum pan.
  3. Stir in olive oil and Three Little Pig’s Championship Rub.
  4. Place pan of potatoes on smoker 275+ degrees and smoke until tender.
  5. While potatoes smoke, make the dressing.
  6. Combine the mayo, mustard, vinegar, chopped eggs, dill, scallions, pickles & seasoning. Cover & refrigerate.
  7. When potatoes are tender, stir the warm potatoes into the dressing.
  8.  Serve warm or cold.

 

Chris Marks  CBBQE (Chief BBQ Expert) Three Little Pig’s Rubs & Sauces and Good-One Smoker/Grills

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